Various Linux Hosting Distribution

The Linux hosting system was first introduced in 1991 and it was a well received operating system until today. Nowadays, users see Linux hosting as a wonderful replacement for Windows or Mac OS X system. Initially, it was only used as a server solution but it is making its way into homes now. One of the biggest reason for it to be so popular is because it is an open-sourced solution. This way, many developers are constantly providing new stuff for it. There are a few ways on how Linux is distributed and this is what we will take a look at in this article.

The first distribution is called Ubuntu. It is considered as the most widely used distribution channel because it is made more for a desktop compatibility instead of a server. Many of its features can match up with the Windows system. Therefore, Ubuntu is a strong player when it comes to making a choice for a hosting solution.

Next, we have the Kubuntu distribution. From its name alone, you can tell that it might have a similarity to the Ubuntu system. In fact, it is very similar to Ubuntu except that it is using a different file system. Both distribution have similar functions and are very user-friendly compared to other distribution of Linux. Therefore, many users opt for this system because they do not have to deal with complicated server management tasks.

Then, we have the Debian distribution. This distribution is a more complex system which may be a little harder for users who do not have the knowledge. This is due to its superior flexibility and performance which can be well used for either a desktop or a server environment.

Following that, we have the Fedora system. Unlike the other, this distribution is considered as a light weight distribution which often is included in dedicated hosting servers. Based on the RedHat Linux, Fedora is commonly used commercially. Therefore, it is competing with Microsoft Windows. Operating Fedora does not require big resources. It can run with limited resources but its performance will still be top notch.

Last but not least, there is the CentOS distribution. CentOS which stand for Community Enterprise Operating System are also a distribution based on the RedHat Linux but it is a free source distribution. CentOs is used for commercial development because of its stability and security.

3 Methods of Linux System Administration and Why Linux Commands Are Best – Linux Training Online

When you are a new user needing to get Linux training, it is often confusing to decide what to focus on.

Should you learn how to use Linux for just one distribution (a.k.a. version, distro)?

Should you focus on learning GUI utilities – or should you learn Linux commands for doing system administration?

Linux Commands Training Tips: The Linux System Administration concepts and commands covered here apply to ALL Linux distros, including: Red Hat, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Edubuntu, Slackware, Debian, Fedora, SUSE and openSUSE.

3 Methods of Linux System Administration and Why Using Linux Commands is the Best Method

1. Using Linux GUI utilities for System Administration

Many Linux distributions have “point-and-click” GUI (graphical user interface) utilities that allow you to do common and popular tasks, like manage the file system, create Linux users, and manage user and group permissions.

However, these GUI utilities are usually specific to a single Linux distribution.

So, learning how to use a Linux GUI in one distro is basically useless if you have to use a different one later, or if you’re working in an environment with multiple Linux distributions.

Linux Training Tips: To run a GUI utility, you need to have a desktop installed and sometimes one isn’t installed on a Linux server because it isn’t needed. In addition to this, the Linux system administration pros only use commands because GUI utilities are too slow to run and time-consuming to use.

2. Doing Linux System Administration Tasks with Commands that are Specific to a Distribution

The major (popular) Linux distributions all have several commands that are specific to that single distribution. In other words, for each popular distro, there are several commands that are specific that just that version.

For example, a Linux distribution will likely have a command that is used to manage partitions (disk space) and this command is specific to that distribution.

Learning how to use commands that are only available on a single distribution is a huge waste of time – if there is an equivalent GNU / Linux command – and there almost always is.

For example, the Linux fdisk command is a GNU command that is used to manage the partitions on a system and this command exists on all distributions.

So, rather than learn a command that is specific to a single Linux distribution, learn the GNU commands because these commands are common to all distributions.

3. Using Linux Commands that are Common to All Distributions – The GNU Commands

The GNU commands are the most popular Linux commands – and they are common to all distributions.

Linux Training Tips: Linux distributions are rising and falling in popularity all the time.

If you just learn how to use Linux by running the GUI utilities in one distro, and then you stop using that distro, then you have to learn all the GUI utilities of the next distro. If you learn how to use commands, then you learn how to use Linux for all distros!

How can you tell which commands are the GNU / Linux commands?

Get an excellent set of videos that shows you the popular GNU commands and then try these Linux commands yourself. Then you can learn Linux the easy way – by watching it and then working with it!

Linux Training Online – Using the Linux CD Command to Change Directory – Linux System Administration

As a new user looking for Linux training, you need to learn how to use commands. And one of the most commonly used file system commands is the CD (change directory) command.

Using the Linux CD Command

The CD (change directory) command is used to change from your current directory (folder) into a different directory.

You need to change into a directory to do Linux administration tasks like:

  • create a new file or remove an existing file
  • copy or move a file to a different directory
  • edit and modify a file, such as a text configuration file for a Linux server
  • create a new directory or remove an existing directory
  • copy or move a directory to a different directory

Linux Commands Training Tips: The System Administration commands, examples and concepts covered here apply to ALL Linux distributions, including: Red Hat, Fedora, Ubuntu, Edubuntu, Kubuntu, Slackware, Debian, SUSE and openSUSE.

Linux CD Command Example – Changing into a Directory Below the Current Directory

To change directory into a directory “below” the current one, you type in CD and a space and the name of the directory you want to change into.

For example, to change into a directory named “letters”, you run the following:

$ CD letters

To change into a different directory, just replace “letters” with a different name.

Linux Training Tips: A directory inside the current one is considered “below” the current directory, and is called a sub directory.

Linux CD Command Example – Changing Up One Directory (Level)

To change directory up one directory (level), you type in CD and a space and then two dots (periods).

For example, if you have moved into the directory named “letters” and want to go back (up) to your previous directory, you run the following:

$ CD ..

Linux Training Tips: The directory above the current one is also called the “parent”.

Beyond This “Linux Training Online” ArticleThe Linux CD command is used in many other ways to navigate around the file system.

To continue your Linux training, you also need to learn how to use the CD command to: change to the root directory, change using an absolute path, and also easily change into a directory parallel to the current directory.

You can clearly and easily see all of the concepts and commands shown above (and lots more!) by watching a Linux training video.

With this method of Linux training, you can see how to use a command step-by-step and also hear how to run the command. This is a very easy way to learn how to use Linux.